The Father of the Scientific Method

For science to continue to advance there must be a continued recognition that the physical world is real and that it functions according to natural/physical laws.

The Christian religion has a word view the fortifies the idea that there are physical laws within the universe, that are discoverable and understandable.

Also, Christianity values and rewards truth and honesty, which any true scientist must respect. Thus, the Christian religion, when obeyed, keeps the scientist honest.

Christianity with its emphasis on learning (building the greatest universities of the world) ushered in the age of science; most of the men, who made the early scientific breakthroughs, were men of faith.

32956649_10156345084673917_5643673025074167808_n

Science studies the physical world through the empirical method as instructed by Bacon. It is Christianity which enables us to make sense out of the observations of our five senses.For the future of science and the true religion to be bright; there must be a mutual respect and understanding that both studies under gird each other–when rightly understood. I qualify my remarks by speaking of Christian religion for others religions may well undermine science.

32885999_10156345083748917_8519110478209744896_n

The Last Supper

29352478_10156221962823917_9046529145148701383_oToday is Holy Thursday when the Church celebrates the Jesus Last Supper with his disciples. When Christians celebrate communion, Jesus taught us to eat of the bread and drink of the cup in remembrance of him.

Roman Catholics and Protestants divide over the issue of the Lord’s Supper. Catholics hold to the doctrine of transubstantiation and Protests consider Communion as symbolic. In the disagreement, I fear both groups miss a crucial point.

Jesus said, Verily, verily, I say unto you, Except you eat the flesh of the Son of man, and drink his blood, you have no life in you (John 6:53). This verse is often associated with the Lord’s Supper. To eat of his flesh and drink of his blood means we are to partake of his sufferings by boldly standing for Truth and Righteousness, when we do so persecution will come our way. We will come to know him in the fellowship of his suffering.

The ceremonial supper represents our willingness to actually partake of his suffering. Unless, we are entering into his passion, we are not completing his work.

The concept of Christian sacrifice is not essentially ritual or liturgical, but it is practical and ethical. We may eat the Lord’s Supper and yet not eat and drink Christ’s body and blood; we may eat and drink Christ’s body and blood and yet not eat the Lord’s Supper.

During Holy Week let us boldly stand for the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ without the gates of our sanctuary buildings.

Whippersnappers!

ox

My late campus preaching associate, Brother Max Lynch, used the term “young whippersnapper” to refer to fledgling preachers, who were irritatingly overconfident, impertinent and presumptuous.

Brother Max was 13 years older than me; he has been with the Lord for about 15 years. Max was faithful to the end; he had health issues so that the last few years of his campus ministry were limited to passing out his hard-hitting tracts.

Max and I observed over the years numerous open-air preachers come and go. Some started with a bang but ended with a whimper.

28166811_10156109015728917_6022224783744035132_n

Although “whippersnapper” is usually applied to the young, it can be applied to older preachers as well, such as those who want to snap the whip over others with whom they disagree. They see it as their job to police the so-called street preacher community.

Some snap the whip my way for what they perceive as being my short-comings or even sins, especially in regards to my defense of Joel Osteen and what they perceive as my softness concerning Roman Catholicism. They can barely stand my carrying a staff crucifix. I have been rebuked privately and publicly. One old friend even accused me of turning “mellow yellow” in my old age.

The word whippersnapper is not much used anymore. George “Gabby” Hayes, who played the grizzled codger to the leading man in old western films, often uttered the word.

Although the young whippersnappers can be annoying, I am glad that they are preaching outside and calling sinners to repentance and faith. Over the years, I have also seen young whippersnappers become mature and faithful preachers.

I suppose the whippersnappers perceive me as an “old goat.”

I do not know the etymology of “young whippersnapper” but I suppose it originally 28058594_10156109019878917_8018394923553681662_n.jpgreferred to a young ox-driver or teamster. Working oxen are taught to respond to the signals of the teamster or ox-driver. These signals are given by verbal command and body language, reinforced by a whip, when necessary.
Or perhaps “young whippersnapper” applied initially to young men with too much leisure, who would crack their whips in camp to show off their supposed skills. But when it came to actually driving the oxen, they weren’t as skilled as they thought.

The experienced driver usually does not have to use the whip but drives the ox with verbal commands such as “giddyup” or “whoa.” Whereas the novice often has to snap the whip because he may not really know his oxen, nor do the oxen know him. The young whippersnapper might show off more authority than he actually possessed by cracking his whip.

My great grandfather, Curtis Hatfield, drove the oxen west during the California Gold Rush. He walked beside the oxen as they pulled the wagon. He was a gentle driver.

 

Roman Catholicism: John Wesley

28378180_10156119356678917_8646325458880316278_n.jpg

Recently, I have been a recipient of criticism and calls to repentance from old friends and a number of people whom I know not based upon what they call my “softness” or ‘support” of the Roman Catholic Church.

I was raised in the United Methodist Church and was taught to revere the name John Wesley. When I actually was converted in 1972, I studied the life and teachings of Wesley and he remains one of my primary influences.

Wesley was sometimes accused of being a Papist or a Jesuit by more hard-core Protestants. Wesley wrote a sermon which he called, “The Catholic Spirit,” which today would be comparable to promoting an ecumenical spirit. Wesley sought to find a common ground between Protestants and Catholics.

In Wesley’s “Letter to a Roman Catholic,” he writes one of his more famous quotes, “If we cannot as yet think alike in all things, as least we may love alike.”

What sayest my Roman Catholic friends and what sayest my Protestant friends, does Wesley find a common ground by which we can extend the right hand of fellowship or not?

Remember when Wesley wrote this letter in 1749, the fires between Protestants and Catholics were much hotter than today.

The following is the link to Wesley’s letter:

 https://johnwesley.wordpress.com/john-wesleys-letter-to-a-roman-catholic/

Roman Catholics? Finney’s View

28279945_10156120797258917_6389418361709477746_n

What should a Protestant’s attitude or relationship be with Roman Catholics? Are we to consider all Catholics as lost and idolaters? The one person outside of the Jesus’ and the apostles, who has most influenced my thinking is Charles G. Finney, who in his Memoirs writes of his revival in Rochester in 1842 (Chapter 26) and some of his results:

“Several of the lawyers that were at this time converted in Rochester gave up their profession and went into the ministry. . . Chancellor Walworth’s son, at that time a young lawyer in Rochester, was another who appeared at the time to be soundly converted. For some reason with which I am not acquainted, he went to Europe and to Rome, and finally became a Roman Catholic priest. He has been for years laboring zealously to promote revivals of religion among them, holding protracted meetings; and, as he told me himself when I met him in England, trying to accomplish in the Roman Catholic church what I was endeavoring to accomplish in the Protestant church. Mr. Walworth seems to be an earnest minister of Christ, given with heart and soul to the salvation of Roman Catholics. How far he agrees with all their views I cannot say. When I was in England he was there and sought me out, and came very affectionately to see me; and we had just as pleasant an interview, so far as I know, as we should have had if we had both been Protestants. He said nothing of his peculiar views, but only that he was laboring among the Roman Catholics to promote revivals of religion among them.”

Notice that Finney did not refer to Mr. Walworth as a “hell bound sinner.” Nor did he say, “if he is truly converted, he will come out of that whore.”

Finney was a wise brother, who earnestly contended for the faith that was once delivered to the saints.